""Hardcore" is a genre of music"

IMHO no you uncreative piece of skunk pick a new name goddamuut

Comments

  • The strongest billiards ball!  ......who you callin' an idiot?!
    what is it supposed to refer to anyway?

    and for that matter, "happy hardcore"?
  • miss me with that ‘weapon accuracy’ shit. im shooting everything. im
    laying down cover fire. im shooting the walls. im shooting my teammates.
    im shooting myself. my accuracy is 100% yall just dont know what im
    aiming at

    what is it supposed to refer to anyway?

    and for that matter, "happy hardcore"?

    without knowing anything about either I can see how you'd make the assumption but "hardcore" and "happy hardcore" are actually completely unrelated.

    the former is a kind of punk rock, the latter is a kind of electronic dance music related to gabber and techno.
  • To Santa Claus, The toy which needs me is the doll of Toyhunter. My house is the second floor of the apartment. Without making a mistake,
    "my genre of punk rock is called hardcore" is like saying "My horror film is called scary"

    No it's not, invent a real name you piece of shit
  • edited 2017-09-14 01:38:09
    Jane said:

    what is it supposed to refer to anyway?

    and for that matter, "happy hardcore"?

    without knowing anything about either I can see how you'd make the assumption but "hardcore" and "happy hardcore" are actually completely unrelated.

    the former is a kind of punk rock, the latter is a kind of electronic dance music related to gabber and techno.
    You surely know more than I do, but I was under the impression that there was also an EDM subgenre called "hardcore" which happy hardcore was related to?
  • edited 2017-09-14 01:42:41
    “His thoughts were red thoughts, and his teeth were white.”
    ^^^, ^^ & ^ I mean, it was applied to the genre by music journalists as a way to describe the fans of that kind of punk, and later on varieties of hip-hop and techno, because of their puritanical devotion and rejection of lighter, softer material. "Happy hardcore" comes from hardcore techno specifically, from which gabber and breakcore also sprang. (In that vein there are also crossover genres like hard trance, hard house and psycore.)
  • Sup bitches, witches, Haters, and trolls.
    Odradek said:

    "my genre of punk rock is called hardcore" is like saying "My horror film is called scary"


    No it's not, invent a real name you piece of shit
    "my genre of book/film/etc is called horror" no it's not invent a real name you piece of shit
  • Once upon a time and a very good time it was there was a moocow coming down along the road
    hard corps
  • ^^^, ^^ & ^ I mean, it was applied to the genre by music journalists as a way to describe the fans of that kind of punk, and later on varieties of hip-hop and techno, because of their puritanical devotion and rejection of lighter, softer material. "Happy hardcore" comes from hardcore techno specifically, from which gabber and breakcore also sprang. (In that vein there are also crossover genres like hard trance, hard house and psycore.)

    Every time someone who understands music tries to make sense of a music genre it just reaffirms my opinion that music genre classification is nonsensical.
  • The strongest billiards ball!  ......who you callin' an idiot?!

    hard corps

    *dresses as mechanical Simon Belmont and throws fish*
  • edited 2017-09-14 13:09:00
    The strongest billiards ball!  ......who you callin' an idiot?!
    Hexartes said:

    ^^^, ^^ & ^ I mean, it was applied to the genre by music journalists as a way to describe the fans of that kind of punk, and later on varieties of hip-hop and techno, because of their puritanical devotion and rejection of lighter, softer material. "Happy hardcore" comes from hardcore techno specifically, from which gabber and breakcore also sprang. (In that vein there are also crossover genres like hard trance, hard house and psycore.)

    Every time someone who understands music tries to make sense of a music genre it just reaffirms my opinion that music genre classification is nonsensical.
    Meanwhile, if classical music were as finely subdivided as modern non-classical genres:

    "I'm okay with waltz and minuet but honestly I prefer mazurka.  Them Poles know how to groove."
  • Once upon a time and a very good time it was there was a moocow coming down along the road

    hard corps

    *dresses as mechanical Simon Belmont and throws fish*

    wat
  • The strongest billiards ball!  ......who you callin' an idiot?!

    hard corps

    *dresses as mechanical Simon Belmont and throws fish*

    wat
    http://contra.wikia.com/wiki/Simondo_Belmont
  • Once upon a time and a very good time it was there was a moocow coming down along the road
    oh, that guy! haw haw
  • To Santa Claus, The toy which needs me is the doll of Toyhunter. My house is the second floor of the apartment. Without making a mistake,
    Calica said:

    Odradek said:

    "my genre of punk rock is called hardcore" is like saying "My horror film is called scary"


    No it's not, invent a real name you piece of shit
    "my genre of book/film/etc is called horror" no it's not invent a real name you piece of shit
    More like "my subgenre of horror is called scary" no it's not, go fuck yourself and die in a fire
  • To Santa Claus, The toy which needs me is the doll of Toyhunter. My house is the second floor of the apartment. Without making a mistake,
    Or "My genre of film is called edited" fuck youuuuuuuuu
  • Sup bitches, witches, Haters, and trolls.
    "my genre of book is called fiction" no it's not invent a real name you piece of shit
  • To Santa Claus, The toy which needs me is the doll of Toyhunter. My house is the second floor of the apartment. Without making a mistake,
    My genre of book is called pages
  • my genre of book is called fiction
  • To Santa Claus, The toy which needs me is the doll of Toyhunter. My house is the second floor of the apartment. Without making a mistake,
    My metal band is named "Metallica"
  • To Santa Claus, The toy which needs me is the doll of Toyhunter. My house is the second floor of the apartment. Without making a mistake,
    My rap name is "Chance the Rapper"
  • the hardest of core


  • Hope will exist in a problematic relationship with reason
    my band is called The Band
  • 無
    she sounds like smoke and honey. we cannot move. it's too beautiful
    ^ how was playing with Bob Dylan like
  • edited 2017-10-10 13:25:30
    The strongest billiards ball!  ......who you callin' an idiot?!

    Genre should just be called Mood Intent.

    1. actually, in a way, yes

    2. and this is why "classical" as a genre name is nowhere even nearly on the same level as all these finely-distinguished genre labels used in, say, electronica

    PARTIAL GENRE LIST
    (WARNING: LONG)

    Spoiler:
    * Allemande (a dance in quadruple meter with partial-beat upbeat)
    * * Traditional Allemande (generally faster)
    * * Instrumental Suite Allemande (often slower and more complex)
    * Courante (a dance triple meter with partial-beat upbeat)
    * * French-Style Courante (generally slower beats with more stuff happening, and ends with a 2/3 bar and irregular rhythm)
    * * Italian-Style Corrente (generally faster beats with sparser texture)
    * Sarabande (slower dance in triple meter with emphasis on second beat)
    * * Traditional Sarabande (faster)
    * * Instrumental Suite Sarabande (slower and more elaborate)
    * Minuet (dance in triple meter at comfortable speed, with one-beat upbeat)
    * * Baroque/Classical Minuet (traditional form, with "Trio" middle section)
    * * Scherzo (faster version of minuet, often humorous)
    * * * Chopinesque Scherzo (same speed as normal Scherzo, but lacking upbeat and generally darker and more virtuosic)
    * Bourree (fast dance in quadruple meter with one-beat upbeat)
    * Gavotte (dance in duple meter with one-beat (half-bar) upbeat and comfortable tempo)
    * * Gavottes That Sound Like Their Upbeat Could Be A Downbeat
    * * Gavottes That Clearly Sound Like Their Upbeat Can't Be A Downbeat
    * Polonaise (dance in triple meter with characteristic rhythms and often cadencing onto third beat)
    * * Dancing Polonaise
    * * Baroque Polonaise (relatively simple texturally)
    * * Chopinesque Polonaise (far more complex texturally, formally, etc.)
    * * * Mixed Polonaise/Other forms (e.g. Polonaise-Fantasie, or That One Polonaise That Has A Mazurka In The Middle)
    * Jig/Gigue (a dance in a compound meter)
    * * Traditional Jig (simpler)
    * * Instrumental Suite Gigue (often a crossover with Fugue/Fugato)

    * Sonata (three movements, usually fast then slow then fast, first movement generally in "sonata-allegro form")
    Component forms:
    * * Sonata-Allegro Form
    * * Sonatina Form (Sonata-Allegro Form minus the development, basically)
    * * Minuet (a.k.a. Minuet-and-Trio), Scherzo (a.k.a. Scherzo-and-Trio) (optional)
    * * Rondo Form
    Sonata subtypes:
    * Scarlatti Sonata (thematically simple, relatively short, one movement)
    * Haydn Sonata (more non-standard movement combinations)
    * Mozart Sonata (most-standard movement combinations, often 3 movements)
    * Post-Classical Sonata (more experimenting with movement combinations again, plus intros, segues, missing first fast movement, etc.)
    * [supertype] One-Movement Sonata (written by composers who had almost nothing to do with each other stylistically such as Scarlatti, Prokofiev, Stanchinsky)
    Sonata variants:
    * Concerto (Sonata for orchestra and soloist)
    * * Divertimento (a smaller Concerto)
    * * Non-Specific Concerto a.k.a. Concerto for Orchestra (no soloist, basically)
    * * Baroque Concerto
    * * Classical Concerto (standard form, generally things like tutti intro and with a cadenza near the end of the first movement)
    * * Virtuoso Concerto
    * Symphony (Sonata with all four standard movements, for full orchestra)
    * * Classical Symphony
    * * Early Romantic Symphony
    * * Late Romantic Symphony
    * * Symphony Based On Movie Music (I remember there exists at least one such symphony like this but I can't remember what it is)

    Waltz (lively dance in triple time, with emphasis on first beat)
    Mazurka (lively dance in triple time, with emphasis on second and/or third beats)

    Passacaglia/Chaconne
    * Traditional Dance Form Passacaglia/Chaconne
    * Passacaglia/Chaconne Based On Bass Line
    * Passacaglia/Chaconne Based On Chord Progression

    Theme And Variations

    Fugue
    * Prelude and Fugue
    * Toccata and Fugue
    * Fugato (name for combining genre, does not exist by itself)

    Toccata
    * Multi-Movement Toccata
    * Standalone Baroque Toccata
    * Prefacing Toccata (i.e. followed by another work)
    * Modern Toccata (generally a virtuosic piece with a perpetual motion mechanic)

    Cuban Dance / Habanera
    * European Habanera (e.g. Debussy's, Bizet's)
    * Parlor Habanera (e.g. Cervantes's; generally shorter)
    * Virtuoso Habanera (e.g. Lecuona's; generally longer)

    [tonality genres - all combining]
    * Tonal
    * * Performed Using Non-Equal-Tempered Tuning
    * Non-Functional Tonal
    * Atonal
    * * Free Atonal
    * * Serialism
    * Microtonal

    etc.


    And we're not even getting into really specific subgenres like "Chopin's Simpler Polonaises That He Wrote As A Kid" vs. "Chopin's More Musically And Technically Complex Polonaises That He Wrote As An Adult"

    or "Happy Lively Mazurka" vs. "Bittersweet Mazurka" vs. "Poignant Mazurka"

    etc.

    I mean, if "Uplifting Trance" is specifically a recognizable subgenre of "Trance" just because it uses major keys, flashy- and bright-sounding instruments, and generally feels bright/happy/uplifting/energizing...
  • miss me with that ‘weapon accuracy’ shit. im shooting everything. im
    laying down cover fire. im shooting the walls. im shooting my teammates.
    im shooting myself. my accuracy is 100% yall just dont know what im
    aiming at

    And we're not even getting into really specific subgenres like "Chopin's Simpler Polonaises That He Wrote As A Kid" vs. "Chopin's More Musically And Technically Complex Polonaises That He Wrote As An Adult"
    that's just comparisons within the same body of work.

    also calling classical music movements "genres" seems kind of, y'know, wrong?
  • Once upon a time and a very good time it was there was a moocow coming down along the road
    moocore
  • can't believe I live in a world with people as fascinating as you ⌘
    ILLBLEED said:

    My rap name is "Chance the Rapper"

    hmm

    I can't help but feel like making fun of this rubs me the wrong way a bit? Like, it's not like it's false advertising or anything, and it wasn't like he chose it out of a lack of creativity (he could just as easily have gone by 'Chano' or just 'Chance' and the effect would pretty much be the same) but IDK

    that being said
    demiurge said:

    my band is called The Band

    this was dumb when Puff Daddy tried to do it and it still is
  • To Santa Claus, The toy which needs me is the doll of Toyhunter. My house is the second floor of the apartment. Without making a mistake,
  • “His thoughts were red thoughts, and his teeth were white.”

    And we're not even getting into really specific subgenres like "Chopin's Simpler Polonaises That He Wrote As A Kid" vs. "Chopin's More Musically And Technically Complex Polonaises That He Wrote As An Adult"
    that's just comparisons within the same body of work.

    also calling classical music movements "genres" seems kind of, y'know, wrong?
    It would, however, be fair to say that High Romantic music regardless of form is generally very different from Second Viennese School free atonality, let alone total serialism or whatever it is George Crumb and György Ligeti are.

    I do think grouping different sorts of dances as "genres" is a bit silly, though, given that a minuet or mazurka can be in any number of musical styles.
  • edited 2017-10-10 19:06:35
    The strongest billiards ball!  ......who you callin' an idiot?!

    And we're not even getting into really specific subgenres like "Chopin's Simpler Polonaises That He Wrote As A Kid" vs. "Chopin's More Musically And Technically Complex Polonaises That He Wrote As An Adult"
    that's just comparisons within the same body of work.

    also calling classical music movements "genres" seems kind of, y'know, wrong?
    Re comparisons within same body of work: Well they DO have noticeably different styles and feels; his early polonaises (the first few pieces he wrote as a kid) are noticeably simpler and lighter/less dramatic than his later ones.  And it's possible to imitate one style without imitating the other.  But anyway.

    Re movements as genres: You're arguably right, since movements are generally understood to be meant to be played together, in sequence.  However, they are performed/broadcast separately often enough (e.g. time-limited competition concert program, radio show filling time, used as background music) that it's useful to consider them separately.

    If someone asks you for "something that sounds like the Moonlight Sonata", you're not going to give them a cheery minuet/scherzo (despite the second movement being that), or a speedy virtuoso piece with a constant driving rhythm (which describes the third movement).  You're going to give them a quiet, sullen piece with a melancholy melody floating above slow-moving accompaniment figuration, probably with triplets.  Now while "something that sounds like the Moonlight Sonata" is a bit too specific to be a genre label, what I'm saying is that people do consider the movements separately.  (Genre label for it would probably be "slow contemplative classical piano".)

    If we look at other multi-movement works, like the Baroque suite ([optional prelude], Allemande, Courante, Sarabande, [miscellaneous dances], Gigue), it's rather clear that the different dance-based movements are well-defined styles with easily identifiable lineages.

    (Now you could say, maybe that doesn't apply to the sonata and its associated multi-movement forms (concerto, symphony, etc.), because the sonata may be derived from Corelli's "trio sonatas" which were a different kind of dance suite or a thing meant for church services.)

    In all fairness, though...

    Classical music never really used genre labels in the same way, so my attempts to "retrofit" classical music with genre labels is a bit of a square-peg-round-hole job, especially since form is a much more important thing in classical music, on par with or even more important than instrumentation and things like rhythmic/harmonic/melodic writing, which are used to define genre in non-classical genres.  There's a lot more crossover of different moods and styles of writing music across the different forms, so you don't have anything that's really consistently a certain mood the way "uplifting trance" can be a thing.  I guess you could say, for example, there is a "cheery classical period sonata" which can be contrasted with a " 'sturm und drang' classical sonata", but the distinction isn't really as clean.  And it only takes one notable composer (e.g. Chopin) to change the meaning of a genre term (e.g. scherzi are no longer just humorous but can now be dark and dramatic).

    Meanwhile, a large number of of non-classical genres involve songs with vocals (exceptions are e.g. some electronica, instrumentals, background music (which could be any genre), and jazz (which has its own form conventions)), and pretty much all those songs follow "song form", which is alternating verse and refrain and then having a bridge/solo then typically having refrain again to end the song.  This isn't to say that they're not creative -- songs with vocals are an extremely varied and diverse lot -- but it's just that the terms people use to distinguish them generally have much more to do with instrumentation and sometimes mood/feel, and almost nothing to do with form, which is almost the opposite of how classical music does its classifications.  (I'm talking beyond just texture, harmonic language, things like that...which tend to be grouped in classical music based on era rather than form name.)
  • The strongest billiards ball!  ......who you callin' an idiot?!

    I do think grouping different sorts of dances as "genres" is a bit silly, though, given that a minuet or mazurka can be in any number of musical styles.

    Incidentally your use of "styles" this way illustrates a nomenclature problem that we have in trying to do this retrofitting: I'd call the mazurka or minuet a "dance style" or "dance form", so now I'm wondering what you mean by "style"...i guess you're thinking of the choices of texture (e.g. clean and simple classical vs. rich romantic/impressionistic vs. some stuff like pointillism?) and harmonic/melodic languages?

    Otherwise, the mazurka and minuet are generally defined by their rhythm and maybe their form.
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