DuckTales 2017 (spoilers) (video of full episode)

edited 2017-08-18 02:17:40 in General Media
DuckTales!  Woo-hoo!

We don't have a thread for this, and I'm gonna make it, even if it's just a liveblog.

Spoilers unmarked.

Comments

  • edited 2017-08-13 00:28:51
    ...And even when your hope is gone
    move along, move along, just to make it through
    "Who's Dewey"?

    Whoa, did this show just reference my favorite episode of Arthur?  Whoa.
  • ...And even when your hope is gone
    move along, move along, just to make it through
    I just took 1d8+6 cold damage from Donald and Scrooge meeting.

    I guess we're having Don Rosa's The Life and Times timeline as canon, or at least parts of it.  

    I wonder if they'll have a flashback to the falling out between Scrooge and his sisters (with young Donald kicking Scrooge in my favorite single panel of all of Don Rosa's comics).
  • ...And even when your hope is gone
    move along, move along, just to make it through
    D'awwwwwwwww at Scrooge having a giant painting of his parents (with those sideburns and that bun for Scrooge's parents, it's clear that these animators know their comics), in addition to the dozens of ones he has of himself (ohmigosh that klondike picture).  Note how the picture of his parents is the one that his desk faces.

    Also love the animation on Dewey rolling himself out of the car window, along the car roof, and back into the car.  It's a nice sight gag for these kind of stiff and motionless characters.
  • ...And even when your hope is gone
    move along, move along, just to make it through
    Webby is... ouch.  Totally a young me reading the comics, obsessed with all these stupid details.

    Poor sheltered history-obsessed child.  I know what it's like to want for friends among the living.
  • ...And even when your hope is gone
    move along, move along, just to make it through
    I love the idea of the kids getting into all the random crap from Scrooge's adventures.  Magic items and sealed enemies.  You can go basically anywhere with this, it's like the Mystery Shack.
  • ...And even when your hope is gone
    move along, move along, just to make it through
    Oh snap Dewey, you did NOT just say that.  You have no idea of the emotional context here.

    Louie and Webby's conversation about lying is pure character gold.   Omission of truth vs. falsified information.  Spinning an acceptable narrative.

    Louie's imaginative and creative, quick with an idea or unlikely explanation, good at filling in the gaps in his knowledge with likely (or likely-seeming) baloney.

    I got a bit of a problem with Dewey.  One minute he's the only one not completely focused on the adventure, the one pointing out that Scrooge is their estranged great-uncle who has wanted nothing to do with them all this time, who won't give trust unearned or feign a bond that hasn't been earned yet (Louie's the one lying to Donald on the phone, I get the feeling that Dewey would have told him the truth); and the next minute he's moping that Scrooge won't let him drive the submarine, that Scrooge doesn't know his name.

    Huey doesn't seem to have a real character yet, though he does seem to be the one who asks Webby for advice and information when it's needed, offers Webby a hamburger when she admits to never having had one, and goes along with her ideas (rubber hose of destiny).  He's got a dynamic with her, but on his own seems the least developed of the triplets.
  • ...And even when your hope is gone
    move along, move along, just to make it through
    Man, these backgrounds are dull.  No texture or anything.  And the water's so low-effort.  Like, they can't even be bothered to draw all the bricks in a wall.  And the fire doesn't even make shadows half the time.

  • edited 2017-08-13 02:25:04
    ...And even when your hope is gone
    move along, move along, just to make it through
    And, with that ending, we have the makings of a larger overarching plot.  Looking forward to this show's next episodes.

    I wish the triplets sounded more like this.  Having them have some elements of Donald's accent/speech-impediment/voice was a neat little detail that doesn't work when they have adult voices like Dipper and Mabel.
  • ...And even when your hope is gone
    move along, move along, just to make it through
  • Good.
  • ...And even when your hope is gone
    move along, move along, just to make it through
    @Yarrun: I hope we see Gabby McStabberson in a later episode.
  • nasty prisms good sir
    is Gabby McStabberson her real name
  • ...And even when your hope is gone
    move along, move along, just to make it through
  • I had my parents watch while we waited for my sister to come home. They used to watch the original run with me when I was small. I liked watching their reactions.
  • Reality has never been an obstacle for me before!!
    @Anonus Hey guess what thanks to Aliroz there’s already a thread for this show!

    Anyways, Webby RULES.
  • I've learned to tolerate drama...except on the boat
    I'm thinking now about Louie and what an interesting character he is

    In most portrayals throughout their history - the big exception probably being the mediocre '90s show Quack Pack - Donald's three nephews have more or less functioned as the same character. In Carl Barks's comics they have even demonstrated a tendency to finish each other's sentences. But this version of Louie, perhaps suggested by his traditional color of green, has been given a strong avaricious streak. The second season in particular focuses on how said streak impacts the way he relates to others, and suffice it to say it bites him in the ass a lot.

    He's portrayed as someone who wants a life of ease and comfort, and isn't particularly picky about how he gains wealth, in contrast to Scrooge's work ethic and strict adherence to making money honestly. Throughout the season he is demonstrated to actually be a very observant and intelligent fellow, who, in his own words, sees all the angles, something that Scrooge and Della want to refine in lieu of his less admirable characteristics. Of course, there is one episode where Louie learns the importance of hard work, which, one could argue, he might have learned sooner had he not gained a front-row seat to the perks of wealth by living with Scrooge.

    Most people I hang out with would probably object to the show's portrayal of Scrooge as a man of high moral character, given their views of the accumulation of vast amounts of wealth as, in and of itself, immoral. The show itself doesn't much demonstrate what life is like for people outside of the orbit of Scrooge and other wealthy individuals. But nonetheless I find Louie quite interesting and relatable in ways I find uncomfortable at times. I seem drawn to ambitious and/or headstrong types with a propensity for getting in over their head - which, of course, they do because they usually succeed at things! And of course, Louie shares my childhood dream of running a massive corporation.

    Louie isn't necessarily bad, nor does he want to be, but I feel like he's on a tightrope morally. And as someone who tries to see all the angles...it's interesting.
  • Reality has never been an obstacle for me before!!
    Anonus said:

    Most people I hang out with would probably object to the show's portrayal of Scrooge as a man of high moral character, given their views of the accumulation of vast amounts of wealth as, in and of itself, immoral.

    For me, personally, I'm kind of willing to give Scrooge a pass just because he's so far removed from reality.

    I basically operate on a sort of willing suspension of disbelief in which I can buy that, in this cartoon fantasy world, there exists a way to amass exorbitant wealth without relying on the exploitation of others.
  • edited 2019-11-21 01:46:57
    ...And even when your hope is gone
    move along, move along, just to make it through
    Scrooge is, traditionally, supposed to be a lovable a-hole with almost no empathy for anyone who isn't an employee or his family, and very limited empathy for those who are.

    In the original Ducktales show's first episode, when Scrooge is asked to donate "a penny for the poor" he says "they're not worth it".  He laments that Boarding School is more expensive than actually taking care of the nephews.  There's also a scene in Duck Manor where he meets with solicitors for no other reason than to giggle at the fact that they thought he wouldn't refuse them and then remove them from his office by means of a trap door, a fire hose, and robo-grabby-arms.

    Note the first page of Don Rosa's The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck:

    image

    Ideally, Current-Day Scrooge (as opposed to young, ambitious Scrooge) is supposed to be a both jerkish and lovable in a way such that (a) both don't cancel each other out and (b) it allows the audience to both laugh at Scrooge's interactions with Donald and understand that there is a genuine bond of familial love there.

    I think characters such as Eddy (from Ed, Edd, and Eddy), Grunkle Stan, and Phoney Bone get a lot of their traits from Scrooge.

    As for "getting exorbitant wealth without exploiting others", y'all should really, really read The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck (I'm sure someone has legally-dubious scans of it somewhere).  Not only is it basically an excuse for Rosa to cram in every possible adventure, reference, backstory, character, "noodle incident", and trivia/continuity-from-the-Carl-Barks-Years he possibly can, it's been reported to be required reading for the writers of the current Ducktales show (which is strange, because the timelines are clearly incompatible.  In Rosa's canon, Scrooge dies at the age of 100 in 1967, and Donald is a WWII veteran surviving on his military pension, and the "modern day" stories take place in the fifties).
  • I've learned to tolerate drama...except on the boat
    The timeline for the current show seems to be intentionally vague anyway
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